News

News from the President Autumn 2014

Jacquie Strudwick - Tuesday, April 22, 2014
Dear Colleagues,

At SOTO-Australasia, we trust that you’ve started the year running and things are growing positively in your lives and practice. I would also like to welcome and acknowledge our new and existing members, and sincerely thank you for your ongoing support and commitment to our organisation. Without such, we could not continue to deliver a high standard of educational seminars and service to the membership.
I would also like to acknowledge Dr Scott Wustenburg for his service and commitment whilst on the board during 2012-2013. On behalf of SOTO-A, we sincerely appreciate your efforts and wish you the very best.

To our relatively new co-ordinator, Jacquie Strudwick, we thank you for your hard work and perseverance in helping the organisation run smoothly and look forward to your ongoing involvement.
Our well anticipated seminar series for 2014 is well underway, with the help of our valued Primary Educators and assisting educators to deliver and teach Dr DeJarnette’s legacy and knowledge of SOT.

Recent Board Meeting:

At our recent planning meeting in March, we have discussed plans to develop more seminars with allied health professional such as dentists, lactation consultants and the like, to support and share information that will benefit each profession. It is also our aim to foster and encourage the expansion of SOT knowledge and techniques, whilst keeping our foundations strong and steady. By doing so, we allow SOT to move into other realms of development, keeping it fresh, current and innovative. We have also looked more closely at redefining our statement of purpose as an organisation which is part of what steers the direction in which we head. We have also strategically looked at how we can become more effective in how we serve the membership, by introducing in the near future webinars and online modules for furthering SOT information. We will be also updating much of our SOT brochures to be referenced by scientific literature, giving you a solid platform.

Mid Year Retreat:

We are excited to announce our well anticipated seminar, by SOT legends Dr Scott Parker and Dr Keith Bastian. It has been sometime since these two SOT great’s have presented together in such beautiful and luscious surroundings such as Noosa scheduled for 11-12 July, titled “Gems from the legends”. For those of you who are new or unfamiliar to the history of SOT, both these gentlemen have been instrumental to the foundation and development of SOT in Australia, as original students of Major DeJarnette. Dr Scott Parker was our very first SOTO-A president.
They will be presenting “Advanced Categories and Advanced Cranial’s”. This will be undoubtedly one to book well in advance...

Advanced Module:

This year we will be presenting “Intra-oral Cranial’s”, with Dr Brett Holden and Dr Troy Miles in Melbourne, Victoria on the 11th October, as a part of our advanced module. Both presenters are very well versed in the arena of Craniopathy and will outline and demonstrate procedures to address specific cranial dysfunction. In addition, you will learn what indicators, both visual and static, together with specific indicator testing to know where and what cranial bone to adjust. This will include assessment and corrections for the occiput, temporal and frontal bones respectfully
Please see our website www.soto.net.au for registration details or call Jacquie at SOTO – A HQ.

Annual Convention:

DR JOHN CRESCIONE PRESENTS ADVANCED CMRT

It is with great pleasure and excitement that we welcome Dr Crescione onto our shores for the 2014 Annual Convention located in the heart of Hobart, Tasmania 1-2 November.
Voted as 2004 International Chiropractor of the year, former chiropractor to the New York Jets football team and past president and Vice president of SORSI over numerous years; Dr Crescione brings his extensive knowledge of visceral dysfunction and applications for what began as “ Bloodless surgery”.
Dr Crescione will present information on Advanced CMRT procedures, improved palpatory assessment of visceral systems, advanced line 1,2, 3 assessment and applications and much more. His engaging and dynamic personality has made him a well sought out as presenter both in the USA, but also Brazil and Korea. This is one definitely one not to be missed.

Lastly, on behalf of the board we hope you had a very happy and safe Easter, together with your loved ones, family and friends.

Thank you for allowing us to serve you as a part of our organisation.
Yours in SOT.
DR Gerald Vargas

Lumbar 4 Colon Reflex

Jacquie Strudwick - Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Welcome to this edition of Expression.

Over the last year we have covered the digestive system reflex work.  We are now up to the Colon reflex work of L4.  This is the ‘I am anaemic all the time’ and ‘I just can’t get my blood built up’ syndrome.

An active TS point and Occipital line 2 area 6 means the distal two-thirds of the large intestine is in trouble.  The last two thirds of the colon includes the transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, sigmoid colon, the recto sigmoid junction, the valves of Houston (Google this one) and the rectum and anus.

The colon is a self-preserving, self-regulating tube if given half the chance.  Colon position is the most important problem which must be corrected to keep this tough organ healthy.

Mechanical fixations of the mesentry are the great enemy of colon health.  The mesenteric apron or mesocolon normally holds the colon loosely in its folds while allowing it freedom of movement.

The mesocolon, when the right portion of the colon is full is pulled inferior.  When the colon empties the normal mesocolon pulls the organ back into position.  The same story goes for the transverse colon which normally maintains a slightly sagging position.  A u-shaped transverse colon that does not return to normal position when empty means abnormal mesenteric problems allowing ptosis:  This dropping or sagging is all too common in middle-aged Australian males.  It is generally a similar sag and lack of recoil problem which occurs at other areas of the colon as well.

Fortunately, the colon is a mechanical structure that responds quickly to the CMRT and Bloodless Surgery work.  When the colon coils are too tight, setting up a spastic colon, you simply stretch the mesenteric apron folds.

When the colon coils are too loose, you tighten them up with toning up procedures to the mesocolon.

Procedure:

  1. The first procedure is the TS cybernetic feedback.  This involves holding the colon entrance points.  The TS points are the points on the sphenoid and the receptor reflex points are those points on the inguinal ligaments which are to be found in your CMRT class notes.  These are held for a minute to make the work which follows more effective and easily workable.
  2. This is the Clavicular major to receptor block technique.  This method is a variation of the CMRT work but has common principle.  DeJarnette work for an underactive colon involves working the lateral clavicle area and then working along the mesentery to produce stretch.  Rees’ procedure is a step inducted before this whereby the clavicle is worked while holding the receptor point in the inguinal ligament.For the overactive colon person, the procedure is to hold the medial part of the clavicle and the receptor point.
  3. Step three is now the CMRT style work of probing for colon abnormalities and clearing them out.
  4. If the colon major has haemorrhoids, you do the liver pump technique to clear the portal circulation backup.
  5. Post-ganglionic control.  This is the technique straight out of your CMRT class notes.  It is performed bilaterally.  It is the only PG that is worked heavily.
  6. The Pre-ganglionic technique is used to re-establish the motor arc.  This is not a complicated procedure.  It is quite a tender area.  This procedure went missing in action for some time in SOT circles and it has been encouraging to see its return.  It involves using ten quick clockwise circular strokes over the mid-sternal area.

We now have covered the digestive reflex work.  Next issues of ‘Expression’ in 2013, will return to the descending order of Reflex levels.  These will include kidney, glandular, prostate and uterine.

The CMRT works takes quite a deal of patience to learn.  On top of that, we have added some more procedure for you to learn over these last years.  Remember that you have the resources available at SOTO Australasia to help you with the day-to-day learning of the work.  Our Co-ordinator has supplies of the Occipital Trapezius reflex chart, ‘DeJarnette 1966 notes’ and the pocket index of the reflexes, all available at our online store!

  

We will see you next issue.

John Kyneur, DC                                               Peter Kyneur, DC

Haberfield, Sydney NSW                              Toronto, Lake Macquarie, NSW



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