News

Your new Co-ordinator Jacquie

Jacquie Strudwick - Saturday, May 04, 2013

Hi Members,
It is with great pleasure that I join you, as your new co-ordinator for SOTO-A.  look forward to this role and its many rewarding challenges.

Previously my work background has been in accounts, hospitality and corporate event  management.  I hope to bring my broad work experience and passion for Chiropractic for the benefit of the organistation and its members.

My family and I are strong  advocates of chiropractic (SOT) care and  the many health benefits that come from great Chiropractic care.  

I have the support of my husband Andrew and my two children, Oliver (3) and Neeka (15 months).  As you can see Neeka is learning all about SOT from a very early age!!! SOTO-A’ s youngest student!
I look forward to meeting you all in the near future.

Regards Jacquie


SOTO-A Educators To Teach at SORSI

Jacquie Strudwick - Saturday, May 04, 2013

Darren Little, Gerald Vargas and Brett Houlden have been invited to teach at Omaha USA in October at their SORSI homecoming seminar.  They will be there to help guide SORSI in international protocol’s for consistency internationally.

Darren, will also be presenting at the SOTO-International meeting in London.

From the President - Autumn 2013

Jacquie Strudwick - Wednesday, May 01, 2013

FROM THE PRESIDENT

Dear SOT Membership

While change can be confronting and stressful, it can also lead to opportunity and growth. This year sees the stepping down of SOTO-A’s long standing  Co-ordinator Mrs Averil Crebbin. We are sad to see her go, but excited for her as she begins a new chapter in her life. Equally we welcomed the appointment of our new  Co ordinator Mrs Jacquie Strudwick.  Jacquie is a mum to a 3 year old and a 1 year old. She brings passion, enthusiasm and a love of Chiropractic to the role. 

On behalf of the board and membership, I would like to extend a sincere welcome to her and her involvement with our organisation. As you can understand, this change over is not an easy one and we appreciate and thank you for your patience. Averil has been very supportive in the change over and again I would like to thank her for the many years of service in helping develop this magnificent organisation.

Please take note of our new number and any other correspondence can be done via the website at www.soto.net.au or via email sotoa@bigpond.com

EXCITING EVENTS FOR 2013

Your Board has been working on planning the events for this year and we are excited with both our Mid Year event in Queenstown and our Annual Convention in Sydney locked in. We are thrilled to have Dr Marc Pick from California back again to our shores to share his knowledge and brilliance for making SOT and neurology understandable. Be sure not to miss his cutting edge presentation in Sydney in November. Marc had the highest number of requests by our membership and seminar delegates when asked who they would like to see present for SOTOA.

 

MARC PICK RETURNS

At the Annual Convention in Sydney we will also host a development program for students on the Friday before the seminar and a half day CA SOT program on the Saturday. Certification exams will be held on the Friday also at the venue. Why not push yourself to the challenge of Basic, Advanced or Craniopath level of Certification. Check out our website for details and conditions plus all other seminar information.

 

SOTO-A ANNOUNCES DIGITAL FORMAT

This year we will be providing digital versions of the seminar notes for those doctors and students who prefer this format. Bring your iPads or laptops to the series and free up that bookshelf. While printed versions will still be available, I encourage you to save paper, help us reduce the organisations printing costs, and have the convenience of keeping the texts at your fingertips at all times. Last years successful Annual Convention on Extremity Adjusting with Dr Jesper Dahl is available for sale on DVD (and now comes with bonus Mp4 versions included). Watch the presentation on your iPhone, iPad or laptop at your convenience.

 

SOTO-I MEETS

The SOTO-International meeting this year will be held in Marlow in the UK and I hope to finalise the standardised criteria for maintaining SOT certification. This means that possibly by the end of the year, all certified SOT members will need to be active in SOT to maintain an active accreditation. This previously has not been necessary in Australia but it is a global standard that SOTOA should and will be embracing. This will result in a standard of certification that maintains a current level of knowledge and a more active membership. Please see this action as a positive step towards improving the quality of SOT in practice and the integrity of our technic.

 

Thanks to everyone who visited our booth at DG in Brisbane recently. I hope you picked up one of our new SOT tee-shirts or our redesigned SOT-explained brochures.

 

Your Board is here to serve you and provide all your SOT educational needs.

 

Yours in Health,

Darren

2013 Mid Year Retreat

Jacquie Strudwick - Tuesday, April 23, 2013
Queenstown Mid Year Retreat

16 & 17 August 2013

Queenstown, New Zealand, is the Southern Hemisphere’s premier four season lake and alpine resort. Surrounded by majestic mountains and nestled on the shores of crystal clear Lake Wakatipu, Queenstown’s stunning scenery is inspiring and revitalising.

With such a huge range of activities in Queenstown, no two days will ever be the same.

Register by clicking here to download a registration form, or contact SOTO-A Co-ordinator

FROM THE PRESIDENT - January 2013

Jacquie Strudwick - Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Dear Colleagues,

 Welcome to the summer edition of Expression, SOTO-Australasia's e-bulletin. Happy New Year and welcome to our new members for 2013. To the continuing SOT family, thank you for your support and faith in me by re-electing me for another term as President. This year I plan to guide SOT in Australia in a direction of growth and establish quality consistency. With the assistance of your new Board, 2013 will bring fantastic educational events, and all the support you need to develop your SOT knowledge. All the events for 2013 are up on the website already so plan your yearly seminar schedule now.

 

beautiful location for annual convention 2012

Our Annual Convention for 2012 was held at Salt in Kingscliff NSW which turned out to be a beautiful location. The experience of Jesper Dahl was not lost on the audience when he presented his material on Extremity adjusting. It was presented in a straight forward hands-on approach that I was able to incorporate into my adjusting on Monday morning with ease. Learning extremity adjusting was actually fun and exciting and the feedback from the rest of the delegates was just as praising.

 

marc pick returns in 2013

We have secured the return of Marc Pick to Sydney for our Annual Convention in November to share his masterful understanding of SOT, neurology and physiology. Not to be missed! 

 

mid-year retreat in the snow!

Mid Year retreat this year is in Queenstown NZ. The proposed date is August 16th and 17th, depending on venue availability which should be confirmed this week. This should make a pleasant chilly change from the usual bikini and zinc cream affair from previous years.

 

long serving co-ordinator calls it a day!

The big change for 2013 will be that our long-standing coordinator Averil Crebbin has decided to move on to seek other ventures and some personal rest and relaxation. It has been 14 years since Averil took the role over from Helen Cutting? and her commitment to the position has been exemplary. She has been instrumental in the success of SOTO-A and has willingly accepted change throughout her years of service. I have very much enjoyed working alongside Averil over the past 12 years and her calming and casual demeanour will be hard to replace. She will be sorely missed but we wish her all the best in her next endeavour. If you know of anyone who may be interested in fulfilling this role please encourage them to send their CV to the Board. Interviews will commence in February.

 

Yours in Health,
Darren.

 

SOT Student Club Presidents for 2013

Jacquie Strudwick - Wednesday, January 16, 2013
Welcome to our SOT Clubs for 2013.  We look forward to seeing as many students as possible at the SOT Seminar Series this year.  We have an SOTO-A Student Liaison Representative - Tori Wright ,who will be the liaison between the Board of Directors and the SOT student clubs at the universities.  Congratulations to the following students who have been appointed presidents of the individual clubs:

Each of the SOT Clubs have a Facebook page that is also linked to the SOTO-A Facebook page. (Click on the colleges above to go direct to their page!)  If you haven’t already ‘Liked’ our page, this is a great way to keep up to date with the latest SOT news!

We welcome updates from the students and will post them on our Facebook page and newsletter.

Lumbar 4 Colon Reflex

Jacquie Strudwick - Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Welcome to this edition of Expression.

Over the last year we have covered the digestive system reflex work.  We are now up to the Colon reflex work of L4.  This is the ‘I am anaemic all the time’ and ‘I just can’t get my blood built up’ syndrome.

An active TS point and Occipital line 2 area 6 means the distal two-thirds of the large intestine is in trouble.  The last two thirds of the colon includes the transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, sigmoid colon, the recto sigmoid junction, the valves of Houston (Google this one) and the rectum and anus.

The colon is a self-preserving, self-regulating tube if given half the chance.  Colon position is the most important problem which must be corrected to keep this tough organ healthy.

Mechanical fixations of the mesentry are the great enemy of colon health.  The mesenteric apron or mesocolon normally holds the colon loosely in its folds while allowing it freedom of movement.

The mesocolon, when the right portion of the colon is full is pulled inferior.  When the colon empties the normal mesocolon pulls the organ back into position.  The same story goes for the transverse colon which normally maintains a slightly sagging position.  A u-shaped transverse colon that does not return to normal position when empty means abnormal mesenteric problems allowing ptosis:  This dropping or sagging is all too common in middle-aged Australian males.  It is generally a similar sag and lack of recoil problem which occurs at other areas of the colon as well.

Fortunately, the colon is a mechanical structure that responds quickly to the CMRT and Bloodless Surgery work.  When the colon coils are too tight, setting up a spastic colon, you simply stretch the mesenteric apron folds.

When the colon coils are too loose, you tighten them up with toning up procedures to the mesocolon.

Procedure:

  1. The first procedure is the TS cybernetic feedback.  This involves holding the colon entrance points.  The TS points are the points on the sphenoid and the receptor reflex points are those points on the inguinal ligaments which are to be found in your CMRT class notes.  These are held for a minute to make the work which follows more effective and easily workable.
  2. This is the Clavicular major to receptor block technique.  This method is a variation of the CMRT work but has common principle.  DeJarnette work for an underactive colon involves working the lateral clavicle area and then working along the mesentery to produce stretch.  Rees’ procedure is a step inducted before this whereby the clavicle is worked while holding the receptor point in the inguinal ligament.For the overactive colon person, the procedure is to hold the medial part of the clavicle and the receptor point.
  3. Step three is now the CMRT style work of probing for colon abnormalities and clearing them out.
  4. If the colon major has haemorrhoids, you do the liver pump technique to clear the portal circulation backup.
  5. Post-ganglionic control.  This is the technique straight out of your CMRT class notes.  It is performed bilaterally.  It is the only PG that is worked heavily.
  6. The Pre-ganglionic technique is used to re-establish the motor arc.  This is not a complicated procedure.  It is quite a tender area.  This procedure went missing in action for some time in SOT circles and it has been encouraging to see its return.  It involves using ten quick clockwise circular strokes over the mid-sternal area.

We now have covered the digestive reflex work.  Next issues of ‘Expression’ in 2013, will return to the descending order of Reflex levels.  These will include kidney, glandular, prostate and uterine.

The CMRT works takes quite a deal of patience to learn.  On top of that, we have added some more procedure for you to learn over these last years.  Remember that you have the resources available at SOTO Australasia to help you with the day-to-day learning of the work.  Our Co-ordinator has supplies of the Occipital Trapezius reflex chart, ‘DeJarnette 1966 notes’ and the pocket index of the reflexes, all available at our online store!

  

We will see you next issue.

John Kyneur, DC                                               Peter Kyneur, DC

Haberfield, Sydney NSW                              Toronto, Lake Macquarie, NSW


NZCC SOT Club News

Jacquie Strudwick - Wednesday, January 16, 2013
On Friday 16th November eight keen NZCC Students, Dr Adrian Stocco, Dr Samantha Culley and Dr Sam Haitsma gathered at the NZCC for the first of many NZCC SOT club gatherings.

On the evening we had a run through of Categories which the students have recently completed. Most importantly for the students we discussed how to integrate their SOT knowledge when they get into practice and how to schedule their patients when using SOT protocol.

The NZCC is strong in producing graduates committed to leadership in the science, philosophy and art of chiropractic who as a result enjoy success in practice, teaching and research.

The students who are part of the NZCC SOT club are a passionate group who envision making SOT an integral part of their practice when they graduate.  (And, not all of them will be jumping the ditch from NZ to OZ!!!)

SOT is developing a greater presence in NZ with two advanced certified DC's and one SOT certified Craniopath. We are encouraging both students to learn SOT and practicing DC's to 'dust off the blocks' and refresh their SOT knowledge.

An initiative of Dr Fiona Haughie and her family is to host the NZCC SOT club students and a select few NZ chiropractors looking to gain SOT certification in 2013 at a 'SOT boot camp' in late January. At this event we will be refreshing their categories knowledge before the NZ CMRT session the following weekend, and allowing time for observation in Fiona's thriving Napier practice along with visiting the Napier farmers market!

SOT in NZ is growing thanks to the support of the student president Jordenne Troy, SOTO-A, Dr Sam Culley and the three NZ SOT Angels; Dr Fiona Haughie, Dr Michelle Dickinson and Dr Sam Haitsma
We look forward to introducing NZ to the SOT members at the annual SOTO-A Mid-Year Retreat in Queenstown, August 2013.

Welcome our Newest Certified Members & 2013 Board Members

Jacquie Strudwick - Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Congratulations to the following doctors for passing their SOT Certification examinations in 2012:

  • Samantha Haitsma, Waiuku, New Zealand - Craniopath
  • Shannyn Lovell, Mudjimba, Qld - Basic and Advanced
  • David Harris, Port Macquarie, NSW - Basic

Your 2013 SOTO-A Board Members

Congratulations to Darren Little who was elected SOTO-A President for another year.  Our Board members are:

  • President - Darren Little
  • Vice President - Gerald Vargas
  • Treasurer - Jim Whittle
  • Secretary - Scott Wustenberg (Newly elected)
  • Board Member - Tori Wright
  • Board Member - Troy Miles (Newly elected)
  • Board Member - Stephanie Willis (Newly elected)

Congratulations also to Darren Little, who was awarded SOTO-International Chiropractor of the Year!
Well deserved Darren!

Lumbar Two - Caecal Syndrome

Jacquie Strudwick - Monday, October 15, 2012
The L2 is the story about the first two feet of the colon consisting of the caecum with its vermiform appendix and the ascending colon. This is the drying out portion of the colon. From the small intestine, the used up intestinal chyme is passed in liquid form to the caecum. In the next half a metre it is dried out to about the consistency of toothpaste. If it is not dried properly a loose bowel is the result.

The ability of the lining of the caecum and ascending colon to absorb water and electrolytes from the chyme gives it its second name which is “absorbing colon”. The distal metre of colon is principally a storage area for faeces or dried up chyme.

Problems in the absorbing colon can be classified under one of three types:
1.    The acute caecal syndrome.
2.    The coeliac sprue syndrome.
3.    The chronic caecal syndrome.

1.    The acute caecal syndrome is the second most common L2 state. It results from bacterial toxins or ingested poisons irritating and inflaming the caecum. This irritated cannot properly dry out the chyme. Instead it passes it violently through the colon with resultant dysentery.
Under this heading also would be the inflamed appendix or the appendix stump. In acute lumbar two presentations, always suspect appendicitis when the appendix is still present. The amazing thing is the appendix, like the gall bladder can still be problematic even after surgical removal. These need occipital neutralisation of the occipital fibre involved along with the TS work and the post and preganglionic.                                                                          

2.    The second type of L2 major is the coeliac-sprue sufferer. Idiopathic steatorrhoea, called sprue is the syndrome with periodic diarrhoea in which the stools are frothy and fatty. This indicates faulty absorption of fats and carbohydrates. Note the problem is not digestion but absorption. These people need the TS  and the CMRT procedures.

3.    The most common L2 major is the chronic caecal type. To review the presentation of these refer back to your CMRT notes. Leg spasms, joint pains and arthritis, in the main. Symptoms similar to rheumatoid arthritis but they can present with many combinations of visceral complexes. There is a connexion between the heart and the liver and gall bladder. Nineteenth century physicians first notice predispositions.

The term, diathesis is a general constitutional predisposition to a certain disorder.
The rheumatoid arthritis diathesis is a well developed body, fleshy round face, with hypertension and tendency towards obesity.

Corrections with TS and CMRT
CMRT work begins with the S2 and occipital fibre neutralisation.  

Step 2:

The TS cybernetic feedback work that you were introduced to at the start of this series. The 2 contact points are Mc Burney’s point and the L2 TS point.

Step 3:

The TS thoracic 4 contact and McBurney point technique.

Step 4:
The carrying of the tissue at McB’s point in a superior direction to help with drainage.

Step 5:
The procedure of choice of Drs Rees and Heese which has been restored as part of CMRT- the preganglionic.

Nutritional procedure
We have spoken previously about glandulars and the variations in the world regions as to availability of products. Dr. Darren Little’s article in the winter “Expression” was timely and pertinent. Darren stated that there is a need to review and rewrite the CMRT management notes, in coordination with the International board .Further, there is a need for current methods and supplements to be included in these sections.
Dr Rees’ nutrition for an L2 major was four-fold: 1. vitamin E2 2.vitamin G 3.chlorophyll perles and 4. Formula 17606.Let us explain. Vitamin E2 was a phospholipid synergist of alpha-tocopherol from beef chromatin. We use the past tense in that we are unsure whether this is still available. In any case, it was never available in Australia or New Zealand. Down in our part of the globe, plant-based nutrition seems to be the order of the day.

Vitamin G was a portion of the B complex of vitamins that are not soluble in alcohol and tend to be vasodilators( riboflavin, niacin, betaine, inositol, folic acid and PABA).The Standard process labs out of Wisconsin used to make these up. This was useful if you were De Jarnette working out of Nebraska but not if you were we Kyneur brothers working out of Australia. (Peter had a distinct advantage of being trained as an herbalist and homoeopath before becoming a chiropractor. John has had the disadvantage nutritionally of adopting a Palmer ideology and being a guest lecture at Sherman college, a few years ago) Chlorophyll, well this is available as either chlorella or spirulina.(This is for those who have colitis and who want to reduce the Guanidine and histamine build up). The fourth supplement available to US and from Standard Process again was 17606 or Betacol.Go to www.standardprocess.com and look it up(we did and were pleased to see that Betacol is still available).This is for the liver and heart involvements of an L2 major. You could probably get some by mail. The Australian TGA(therapeutic goods act) would make it difficult to bring to Australia. New Zealand’s government is a little more liberal.

This article series on the TS work is written and published to give our modern SOT,CMRT and Cranial scholar and practitioner some additional insight into the organ work that is part of the chiropractic heritage. We have added a bit of our own commentary from time to time and have been grateful to Averil and our previous editors for their lack of censorship. Until summer, we remain;

Dr John Kyneur, Sydney, NSW
Dr Peter Kyneur, Lake Macquarie, NSW



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