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THORACIC 11 AND 12 KIDNEY SYNDROME

Jacquie Strudwick - Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Welcome to our final four articles on the CMRT and Bloodless Surgery work. For those who have been following this series, you will know we did the Gastro-Intestinal syndromes (T10, L1, L2 and L4) in 2012.
This year, we complete the work looking at kidney, glandular and prostate and uterine syndromes. This article is about kidney syndrome.

One principle you learn in SOT is that the CMRT work is part of Category One. However, in practice, you will notice that some involvement of organs takes place in Category Two patients. Indeed, you will have detected the ptosed kidney as part of your pre-blocking Category Two analysis and corrections.
Dr Rees started the CMRT/Bloodless Surgery series with kidney syndrome. This was published in the SORSI dispatches. The original article was two paragraphs long. We will print this section in full and then discuss the modern developments.

In July 1972 Dr Rees wrote:
“When T.S D11, 12 (temporal sphenoidal thoracic 11 and 12 reflex points are found just superior of the external auditory meatus) are active and “ouch” when palpated during your Temporal Sphenoidal search, then you may use the following bloodless surgery procedure.
1.    Raise kidney into normal position.
2.    Drain kidney congestion.
3.    Raise rib cage to hold kidney in normal position.
4.    In severe prolapsed kidney cases use an orthopaedic appliance to hold the kidney in position for 3 days.

Technique:
Turn patient on side with involved kidney up. Hold the patient’s flexed knees to the chest with crossed arms. The patient now takes three deep breathing cycles as doctor goes in soft tissue below kidneys and at the same time raising tissue gaining at each breathing cycle. Doctor holds kidney up as patient straightens legs. Now doctor counts slowly to twenty and patient continues to keep legs straight as doctor does 12th rib raising technique. If the T.S 11-12 is now palpated it will be pain-free.”

The work has developed from 1966 to include the details and format we now have in CMRT. This includes the triad, pain map, signs symptoms and diathesis, reflex points, corrections for overactive and underactive types, post ganglionic procedure and patient management, including nutritional needs.

One of the projects of SOT International is to bring the nutrition aspect of CMRT up to date and to compare methods in the different world regions. Generally, there is a need for Vitamins A, C and E.

Simply, the kidney tubules are lined with mucous membrane. IF too little vitamin A is given these tubules soon become plugged with dead cells. Vitamin C is capable of increasing urine output. Vitamin E deficiency produces nephritis which also results in the tubules becoming so plugged with dead cells that urine cannot pass.

Enjoy your study and practice of SOT.

John S. Kyneur            Peter J. Kyneur
Sydney, NSW            Newcastle, NSW

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