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Lumbar 4 Colon Reflex

Jacquie Strudwick - Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Welcome to this edition of Expression.

Over the last year we have covered the digestive system reflex work.  We are now up to the Colon reflex work of L4.  This is the ‘I am anaemic all the time’ and ‘I just can’t get my blood built up’ syndrome.

An active TS point and Occipital line 2 area 6 means the distal two-thirds of the large intestine is in trouble.  The last two thirds of the colon includes the transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, sigmoid colon, the recto sigmoid junction, the valves of Houston (Google this one) and the rectum and anus.

The colon is a self-preserving, self-regulating tube if given half the chance.  Colon position is the most important problem which must be corrected to keep this tough organ healthy.

Mechanical fixations of the mesentry are the great enemy of colon health.  The mesenteric apron or mesocolon normally holds the colon loosely in its folds while allowing it freedom of movement.

The mesocolon, when the right portion of the colon is full is pulled inferior.  When the colon empties the normal mesocolon pulls the organ back into position.  The same story goes for the transverse colon which normally maintains a slightly sagging position.  A u-shaped transverse colon that does not return to normal position when empty means abnormal mesenteric problems allowing ptosis:  This dropping or sagging is all too common in middle-aged Australian males.  It is generally a similar sag and lack of recoil problem which occurs at other areas of the colon as well.

Fortunately, the colon is a mechanical structure that responds quickly to the CMRT and Bloodless Surgery work.  When the colon coils are too tight, setting up a spastic colon, you simply stretch the mesenteric apron folds.

When the colon coils are too loose, you tighten them up with toning up procedures to the mesocolon.

Procedure:

  1. The first procedure is the TS cybernetic feedback.  This involves holding the colon entrance points.  The TS points are the points on the sphenoid and the receptor reflex points are those points on the inguinal ligaments which are to be found in your CMRT class notes.  These are held for a minute to make the work which follows more effective and easily workable.
  2. This is the Clavicular major to receptor block technique.  This method is a variation of the CMRT work but has common principle.  DeJarnette work for an underactive colon involves working the lateral clavicle area and then working along the mesentery to produce stretch.  Rees’ procedure is a step inducted before this whereby the clavicle is worked while holding the receptor point in the inguinal ligament.For the overactive colon person, the procedure is to hold the medial part of the clavicle and the receptor point.
  3. Step three is now the CMRT style work of probing for colon abnormalities and clearing them out.
  4. If the colon major has haemorrhoids, you do the liver pump technique to clear the portal circulation backup.
  5. Post-ganglionic control.  This is the technique straight out of your CMRT class notes.  It is performed bilaterally.  It is the only PG that is worked heavily.
  6. The Pre-ganglionic technique is used to re-establish the motor arc.  This is not a complicated procedure.  It is quite a tender area.  This procedure went missing in action for some time in SOT circles and it has been encouraging to see its return.  It involves using ten quick clockwise circular strokes over the mid-sternal area.

We now have covered the digestive reflex work.  Next issues of ‘Expression’ in 2013, will return to the descending order of Reflex levels.  These will include kidney, glandular, prostate and uterine.

The CMRT works takes quite a deal of patience to learn.  On top of that, we have added some more procedure for you to learn over these last years.  Remember that you have the resources available at SOTO Australasia to help you with the day-to-day learning of the work.  Our Co-ordinator has supplies of the Occipital Trapezius reflex chart, ‘DeJarnette 1966 notes’ and the pocket index of the reflexes, all available at our online store!

  

We will see you next issue.

John Kyneur, DC                                               Peter Kyneur, DC

Haberfield, Sydney NSW                              Toronto, Lake Macquarie, NSW



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